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Hi, I'm Nellwyn!

The Cardinal Press is a lifestyle blog about living beautifully and creatively, every day.

Cardinal Points 12.12.14

Cardinal Points 12.12.14

Cardinal Points is a weekly feature in which I highlight a few interesting articles from around the web. Here's what's noteworthy this week:


image via huffingtonpost.ca

image via huffingtonpost.ca

Ontario is infamous for some pretty strict regulations on the sale and consumption of alcohol. It's also notorious for overly inflated liquor prices. The price of a glass of wine in many Toronto restaurants could by you a whole bottle at the LCBO and for the same price you could get two or three bottles if you happened to be pretty much anywhere in Europe. A story about a non-competition agreement between the LCBO and the Beer Store has recently come to light and has the restaurant industry up in arms. According to Restaurants Canada, the agreement restricts the competition between businesses that keeps prices low and has results in the inflated price of liquor we see in bars and restaurants. To read the full story, click here.


image via stutterstock/theatlantic.com

image via stutterstock/theatlantic.com

My mom is left-handed and likes to joke about the plight of the left-handed person living in a right-handed world. Simple things like scissors and stick-shifts are all backwards, but left-handedness is surely a sign of higher intelligence. Or so my mother would have us believe… This article from The Atlantic gives us a little insight into the trials of the left-handed throughout history and explores new research which suggests that left-handed people earn less than their right-handed friends. To find out what could possibly be responsible for this discrepancy, check out the full article here.


image via thestar.com

image via thestar.com

A recent Supreme Court ruling allows police to search through the contents of a suspect's cellphone upon arrest without a warrant. This Toronto Star editorial argues that a warrantless search is an invasion that violates a suspect's privacy rights. Nowadays cellphones can contain everything from passwords to bank information and many people feel that this information should not be accessible to police. Especially not before a suspect is convicted. On the one hand, a cellphone could house valuable information about illegal activities or accomplices. But on the other hand, unlike a backpack or briefcase, a cellphone cannot conceal a drugs or a weapon and doesn't pose any immediate threat to the general population. To read the Star's full argument click here.


What's Up Toronto?: Dec 15-21

What's Up Toronto?: Dec 15-21

Potluck Bruschetta

Potluck Bruschetta