September Reading List

This semester, as part of my MFA in Creative Non-Fiction, we all have to read three books from the popular nonfiction canon. The idea is that we read three of the greats and analyze their significance and contribution to the genre. 

I was excited to get this assignment because it means that I finally have the perfect excuse to go buy some books that have been on my reading list for ages. Lately almost all of my reading has been research for my own book project so I'm looking forward to losing myself in some great writing on entirely different subjects. 

Plus, I love being able to curl up with a good book and call it homework!

Without further delay, here's my September reading list:

In Cold Blood by Truman Capote  

On November 15, 1959, in the small town of Holcomb, Kansas, four members of the Clutter family were savagely murdered by blasts from a shotgun held a few inches from their faces. There was no apparent motive for the crime, and there were almost no clues. 

As Truman Capote reconstructs the murder and the investigation that led to the capture, trial, and execution of the killers, he generates both mesmerizing suspense and astonishing empathy. In Cold Blood is a work that transcends its moment, yielding poignant insights into the nature of American violence.

Breakup by Catherine Texier

A real-life account of the end of a high profile 18-year marriage. Texierès husband left her for another woman and here she writes about the powerful sexual relationship she shared with her husband even during the break-up, and how their marriage and working relationship was slowly destroyed. 

A Supposedly Fun Thing I'll Never Do Again by David Foster Wallace

In this exuberantly praised book - a collection of seven pieces on subjects ranging from television to tennis, from the Illinois State Fair to the films of David Lynch, from postmodern literary theory to the supposed fun of traveling aboard a Caribbean luxury cruise liner - David Foster Wallace brings to nonfiction the same curiosity, hilarity, and exhilarating verbal facility that has delighted readers of his fiction, including the bestselling Infinite Jest. 

All book descriptions are taken from

What do you think? Do any of these interest you? What's on your reading list this month?